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County libraries offer free shred day Saturday

County libraries offer free shred day Saturday

The Spokane County Library wants to help you fight identity theft with a free shred day this Saturday.


Both the North Spokane Library and the Spokane Valley Library locations will be hosting a shred. Paper documents, computer hard drives, disks, and tapes are able to be disposed of safely while protecting your important information. DeVries Business Services is providing the document destruction and says there’s no need to remove credit cards, staples or other metal fasteners.

Clothing drive benefits area foster children

Clothing drive benefits area foster children

There are more than 20,000 foster children living in the Northwest and Sleep County wants to help make life a little easier for those kids. Now through July, all area Sleep County locations are accepting clothing donations that will go straight to foster children in need of new clothes to call their own.

Union Gospel Mission celebrates new graduates of the Life Recovery program

Union Gospel Mission celebrates new graduates of the Life Recovery program

Tuesday night 25 people from the inland northwest graduated from the Union Gospel Mission's Life Recovery program. It's designed to break the homelessness cycle and dependence on drugs and alcohol.

"My life was empty, and hopeless and a mess, unmanageable," Chantell White said.

She was one of the 25 who made it through the program.

"I didn't realize that people cared," White said. "I didn't realize that I was forgiven, I didn't realize that I had a hope and a future."

She began her change two years ago. Before that she was an addict, in and out of jail and had her kids taken away from her.

"I remember Chantell coming into a class not only being broken, but not believing that anything would really change," program leader Joann Zajick said.

The two years she spent working on herself would not come easy. She left the program at one point, only to come back.

"I'm serious now," Zajick said, remembering what Chantell said. "I'm ready for what it's going to take for me to really change and from that you see this beautiful woman today."

Will recreational marijuana supply meet public's demand?

Will recreational marijuana supply meet public's demand?

Recreational marijuana is being grown right now and will hit retail store across Washington in early July but will there be enough to go around?

"This strain is called Train Wreck, it's being harvested today," said Scott O'Neil with Pacific Northwest Medical, as he trimmed a 12" long 1/4 lb. marijuana bud.

Right now O'Neil works in the medical marijuana field but in two weeks he'll be on his own.

"And we'll be selling recreational marijuana," O'Neil added.

He hopes his new store will be the first recreational marijuana store to open in Washington; O'Neil Industries, an authorized retailer of Kouchlock.

"We've secured product from a couple of vendors, definitely working on getting more. The product we have right now is probably going to last a couple days," said O'Neil.

O'Neil said some producers are already sold out for the next year and that's weeks before retail stores even open.

That supply will depend on how many growers can get up to speed in the next couple of months. In hopes of building clientele early O'Neil says he's going for as much variety as he can get his hands on.

Marijuana retailers getting ready for opening day

Marijuana retailers getting ready for opening day

In a little over three weeks Washington will open its first recreational marijuana stores, with only a handful of retailers to receive licenses in July.

For Scott DeKay, it's going to be a family business.

"We got our display case here. We're going to have our pipes and then sealed samples of marijuana for customers to look at," said Scott DeKay, owner of Savage THC in Clayton.

He's filed the last bit of paperwork required to obtain a recreational marijuana retail license.

"They're trying to get 20 open by the first of July and I'm still hoping to be one of those 20," said DeKay.

Dekay says getting into the first group of retailers to open will be important to start paying off the cost of setting up shop.

"They'll stand here, like I said out front, they'll have the little tray right here. Put the product in, push it out," said DeKay as he demonstrated how the transaction will be handled behind bullet proof glass.

Now that the final paperwork is done, arguably the hardest part, second only to finding a retail space, Dekay only needs to pass an inspection, pay his license fee and secure product for opening day.

Husband holds golf tournament to raise money for wife's lung transplant

Husband holds golf tournament to raise money for wife's lung transplant

A Spokane woman is fighting for her life, in need of a double lung transplant after battling cystic fibrosis for 30 years.

John Moriarty says his wife Gina is the love of his life, right up there with golf, and she's in need of some serious help.

"About a year ago Gina came down with a very severe case of pneumonia. She was in the hospital for two months and there was a lot of damage done to her lungs," John said.

Gina was diagnosed at age two and now at age 30 has just 15 percent lung capacity.

To help raise money for Gina's medical costs, John has changed the focus of his annual charity golf tournament "The Big Kahuna" to help his wife.

"It's a double shotgun start on July 12, four person teams. It's a scramble format, and its all for fun," said John.

The procedure will cost nearly $1 million and insurance is covering most of it, but there are still a lot of expenses they will be paying out of pocket.

"We have to actually move over to Seattle and live in transplant housing, and that's something that's not covered by insurance and it's roughly $3-4 thousand a month," said John.

New round of Washington charter proposals begins

Organizations that want to open a charter school in Washington state have until the end of the day on Friday to turn in a form that says they plan to apply to the statewide charter commission.

As of Thursday afternoon, five letters of intent had been posted on the state's charter school website, including some from organizations that had applied during the last round but weren't approved.

The next deadline in the process will be July 15, when formal applications to open a charter school are due. After public forums, interviews and other evaluations, The Charter School Commission plans to vote in October on which schools will be given tentative approval to open.