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Working 4 you: Be prepared for the cost of fall sports

Working 4 you: Be prepared for the cost of fall sports

There's been a lot of inspiration for young Washington kids in sports this year, with Clint Dempsey being the star of Team USA in the World Cup, and not to mention the Seahawks winning the Superbowl. But, if it's a child's first season playing sports, many parents may underestimate just how much it's going to cost.

Events like the Superbowl, the Olympics and the World Cup give aspiring athletes new heroes. Most children want to go out and play just like them, and parents are rarely going to hesitate, realizing the benefits that team sports offer.

"It's teamwork. You get to work together, and I always get to know the other team a lot," said Emma Pelletier, a youth soccer player.

Jahehi Burford, another youth soccer player added, "If you're a kid that doesn't talk in school, you can go to soccer, and you have many friends there you can just talk to."

And Soleil Brown, another youth soccer player, said, "I get to do things that I love, and I get to exercise too."

But what parents of kids playing sports for the first time might not realize is the costs can certainly add up.

Cathy McMorris Rodgers introduces new Military Outreach Liaison

Cathy McMorris Rodgers introduces new Military Outreach Liaison

Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers released a statement Thursday announcing retired Air Force service member and longtime veterans advocate John Davis as her new Veterans and Military Outreach Liaison.

“I am both humbled and honored to welcome John Davis to my team. Over the past four decades John has dedicated his life to serving our country, our military and our veterans, and his compassion for the Eastern Washington veteran community has impacted countless lives,” the congresswoman said.

Davis' role with the congresswoman's office will be to assist veterans with their claims and records, and provide support and information on how to navigate the VA system.

Davis enlisted in the Air Force in 1968 and served in many locations, including Fairchild Air Force Base in the 92 Munitions Maintenance Squadron. While assigned at Fairchild AFB, John graudated from Spokane Falls Community College and Eastern Washington University where he studied counseling and sciences.

Spokane Shock reach multi-year lease agreement with arena

Spokane Shock reach multi-year lease agreement with arena

The Spokane Shock announced this week they have reached an agreement for a three-year lease with the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena.

“I am absolutely delighted to announce that the Spokane Shock have entered into a three-year lease agreement with the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena,” said Nader Naini, the Chairman of Arena Football Partners. “Since acquiring the team in January, we have held steadfast to our commitment to keep this civic asset and its rich tradition in Spokane. This agreement with the Spokane Public Facilities District is consistent with our unwavering responsibility to our loyal fans and our supportive business partners to continue providing a fan friendly, first class sports entertainment experience.”

The 2015 season will mark the Shock's 10th season as a franchise. They kicked off their inaugural season in 2006 as a member of the af2 (arenafootball2) and after ArenaCup wins in 2006 and 2009, the team made the jump to the Arena Football League in 2010 where they won their first ArenaBowl Championship in their first season.

Cyclist safety takes center stage following hit and run

The hit and run death of Spokane Valley bicyclist has re-opened the topic of bicycle safety. With more people commuting via bike, cyclist safety is more important than ever.

The League of American Bicyclists has named Washington state "the most bicycle friendly state in America" for seven years in a row, but two wheel transit still has its fair share of risks.

Between 1997 and 2006, 103 cyclists died on Washington roads.

Erika Prins of the Spokane Bicycle Advisory Board gives these tips for staying safe:

1. Behave predictably. which means not swerving into other lanes randomly or making any sudden movements.

2. Make yourself visible. Wear bright protective clothing and put lights and reflectors on your bike.

3. Avoid busy roads. Accidents are more likely to occur in high traffic areas.

4. Always wear a helmet.

Prins adds that courtesy and respect between drivers and cyclists is crucial for keeping everyone on safe on the road.

Detectives continue investigation into fatal hit and run

Detectives continue investigation into fatal hit and run

Spokane Valley Sheriff's detectives are continuing to investigate a fatal hit and run accident early Tuesday morning on North Park Road overpass at 1-90.

Investigators say 47-year old Robert R. Royer was killed after he was struck by a car.

Detectives have located a person of interest and and possible suspect vehicle, they are also processing evidence that includes video from a nearby home.

Wednesday Royer's fiance Tina Murray said he had gotten of work and was headed to the Spokane river around 1:30 a.m.

"He had this bright idea throughout the day that he was going to catch a fish for Royanne because she hadn't caught one down at the fishing hole," Murray said.

The couple had planned to practice for the first day of school by getting up early and making the short walk to the school. After that they planned to head to the river where Royer would have a fishing pole with a fish on the line waiting so he could watch the excitement in his daughters eyes as she reeled it in.

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Dorms are filling up fast around Washington State as students begin or continue their college education, and the state Fire Marshal wants to make sure everyone has a safe school year.

“Fire safety should be reviewed as students settle into their new places,” said State Fire Marshal Chuck Duffy. “Understanding the safety features of a building and knowing your escape routes can significantly increase your personal safety.”

The United States Fire Administration reports an estimated 3,800 university housing fires occur each year. The leading causes include cooking, intentionally set fires, careless smoking, unattended candles and overloaded electrical wiring. Marshal Duffy suggests the following tips to reduce the risk of fire and increase safety:

Cooking should only be done in a location permitted by the school’s policies. Never leave your cooking unattended. If a fire starts in a microwave, leave the door closed and unplug the unit.

Working 4 you: How to crave healthy foods

Working 4 you: How to crave healthy foods

Could it be possible to rewire your brain so that it wants, even craves healthy food? New research suggests it could be possible.

So how do you do it?

Researchers suggest all you have to do is eat healthy. They say by following a healthy diet, a person can actually change how their brain reacts to high- and low-calorie foods. It could be the difference between deciding to snack on carrots or cookies.

Researchers divided the participants of this study into two groups.

The experimental group was offered healthier meals for six months and asked to reduce their calorie intake by 500 to 1,000 calories per day. The meals in the second group, the control group, were not adjusted.

The experimental group ended up losing about 14 pounds, on average during that period.

Then, at the end of that six months, both the experimental and control groups were shown photos of healthy and unhealthy foods.