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The art of extreme couponing

The art of extreme couponing

The cost of groceries and household items keeps going up, with the average family of four spending up to $240 a week on food. But you can save as much as 75 percent on your grocery bills through extreme couponing.

When you think of extreme couponers you might imagine someone with an excessive, random stockpile of goods like 100 jars of pickles and 400 rolls of toilet paper.

But you can save big and not buy in bulk. Local couponer Shaunda Holbrook calls herself a small time extreme couponer, but her tips and tricks can help you save big. Saving money is her mission, and she has a stockpile room with toilet paper, toothpaste and soaps. It's like a mini store full of items she didn't pay full price for.

"I would say my grocery bill is probably cut down about 75 percent now," she said.

Annually she saves between $10,000 and $15,000 on groceries.

She wasn't always this savvy at saving.

"All the sudden the walls come crashing in when you realize everything that you had built is going away," she said.

Two years ago tragedy struck, twice.

The search for Washington’s Outstanding Senior Volunteer

The search for Washington’s Outstanding Senior Volunteer

Every day, Washington senior volunteers generously give their time and service to help others. Now here’s your chance to give back by nominating a deserving older adult in your community for his or her outstanding service through the Salute to Senior Service® program.

Sponsored by Home Instead, Inc., Salute to Senior Service recognizes the invaluable contributions of adults age 65 and older who give at least 15 hours a month of volunteer service to their favorite causes.

“Seniors have so much to give and make a positive impact on our communities daily,” said Lois Etienne, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care office serving Spokane. “Senior volunteerism not only benefits others, but also helps seniors stay active and socially engaged in their communities – important elements of healthy aging.”

Police searching for missing teen

Police searching for missing teen

UPDATE: Couer d'Alene Police have located Maya Fooe

 

The Coeur d'Alene Police Department is looking for an endangered missing girl that could be a runaway. Maya Fooe, 14, was last seen at her home in the 6100 block of N. Courcelles Parkway around 5 am Monday morning.

Spokane Valley leader passes away

Spokane Valley leader passes away

From the City of Spokane Valley:

 

It was with deep sadness that the City of Spokane Valley learned that former Councilmember Gary Schimmels passed away unexpectedly in his sleep last night.  Until he left office at the end of 2013, Schimmels had been the last remaining Councilmember to have served since the city's incorporation, and had served as the City's Deputy Mayor over his last four years in office.

CV bus drivers rally around co-worker

CV bus drivers rally around co-worker

From the Central Valley School District:


Bus driver Teri Perry and her husband Don were overwhelmed by the support of fellow CV bus drivers this morning.

Whitworth Prof. reflects on Mandela's legacy

Whitworth Prof. reflects on Mandela's legacy

Nelson Mandela's influence was felt around the world, and especially by one local professor. Gordon Jackson is a communications professor at Whitworth and was born in South Africa.

"(Mandela's death) comes as a blow to all people in South Africa as well as many around the world," Jackson said.

Professor Jackson was born into an apartheid era of South Africa. A time when the world around him was black and white and tension was at an all time high.

Then in the early 1990's Nelson Mandela was released from prison and changed the country.





"One who brought a time of reconciliation to South Africa when the country could very easily have descended into a blood bath with racial violence," Jackson said.

Jackson says Mandela was the right man at the right time, and his calm leadership could have been much different.

Meet the Athletes: Spencer

Meet the Athletes: Spencer

Week days after school you can find Spencer Kimbro shooting hoops in the gym at the elementary school where his mom teaches in Moses Lake. This fall, he raced cross country at Chief Moses Middle School for the first time. On weekends, the Kimbros head to Spokane so that Spencer can practice with ParaSport Spokane.


Spencer, who has Spina Bifida, is no stranger to being interviewed. He’s the face of Youth Outdoors Unlimited, a Central Washington based nonprofit that teaches kids with disabilities how to hunt and fish. Spencer learned how to hunt and fish in 2010 and loves it.