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Friends hope to find a home for Teresa

When Teresa Adams purchased her mobile home in 2000 she thought she finally had a home that she could build into her own castle and rebuild her life. Now, the walls of her castle are threatening to cave in and the community has stepped up to help her rebuild her kingdom.


“It’s falling apart,” said Teresa. “It’s my castle and my castle is crumbling.”

Life is sweet for growing Celebrations Bakery

Life is sweet for growing Celebrations Bakery

After purchasing Celebrations Bakery two years ago, owners Amber and Joe Owens are ready to expand their business. In a few weeks Celebrations will open a second location in the Spokane Valley to better serve their current and future customers.

 

The new store, located on the corner of 4th and Sullivan, is where Joe and Amber originally wanted to open a bakery three years ago. When leasing the space didn't work out they decided to purchase Celebrations in the Garland District.

 

“I had been baking out of my home for a long time,” said Amber. “By word of mouth alone I was busy.”

 

“We put it all on the line,” said Joe. The risk of purchasing Celebrations paid off, and the business has continued to grow and expand since they took over in 2011. Celebrations used to serve only cupcakes, but now offers cake pops, cookies and custom order cakes for all occasions.

 

Clinic helps stroke survivors find their golf swing

Clinic helps stroke survivors find their golf swing

A swift swing and the satisfying thunk as a golf club hits the ball is something that lovers of the game struggle to find following a stroke. On Thursday morning, stroke survivors worked with a PGA Golf Pro at The Highlands Golf Course to adjust their swing and get back on the course.

 

According to the American Stroke Association, stroke is a leading cause of long term disability among adults in the U.S. It's a statistic that Executive Director Heidi Hershly knows all too well as a stroke survivor.

 

“Life is not ever the same for you again,” said Hershly. “Sometimes you have to tweak things to get back to life. We just have to adjust and adapt.”

 

“Smashin’ September” Table Tennis tournament next weekend

“Smashin’ September” Table Tennis tournament next weekend

Table tennis fans of all ages and experiences are invited to participate in a local tournament next weekend.

News Release from Spokane Table Tennis:

Many Spokane area table tennis players are expected for the Spokane Table Tennis monthly tournament next week as they prepare for a major national tournament being held in Spokane in mid-October. The monthly STT tournament is September 28 at the North Park Racquet Club, located at 8121 N. Division in Spokane. The fun competition is open to everyone and registration is just $10, according to Lisa Hagel, STT Manager.

“We’ve had such great participation in our tournaments, and now the major national tournament held here in Spokane with $10,000 in prize money is less than a month away,” Mrs. Hagel exclaimed.

Cash awards are also provided to the winners in the Spokane Table Tennis tournament divisions and advance registration is strongly encouraged through: www.spokanetabletennis.com emailing Mrs. Hagel at lisahagel06@yahoo.com or calling 768-1780. Warm-up play is at 11:00 and the STT tournament begins at noon.

Local author publishes book to benefit Vanessa Behan

Local author publishes book to benefit Vanessa Behan

A local professor and author has found a way to combine his love of words with his love for the children at the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Available this week, You've Made Your Bed Now Go Bounce On It, looks at the world of children while giving the proceeds back to the nursery that inspired it.

 

“I've long had a love affair with quotes,” said Gordon Jackson, a professor of journalism at Whitworth University. This is the seventh anthology of quotes that Jackson has complied, and this time, because the topic was close to his heart, he chose to self publish.

 

Beep baseball brings pride to Spokane's blind community

Beep baseball brings pride to Spokane's blind community

It takes patience, timing and good form to make a solid connection to a ball with a bat. Now, imagine doing all of that blind, guided only by a beep being emitted from the ball as it comes toward you. On Saturday, Spokane Pride Beep Baseball will play their fist home game guided only by the sounds around them.

 

“It can be challenging, but it's all worth it,” said Spokane Pride coach Troy Leeberg. This is the second season for the city's only beep baseball team, and it's the first season that there's been another team close enough for them to play against. On Saturday, the team will face off against a new team out of Seattle for a double header.

 

Beep baseball looks and plays differently than the traditional game. The sport is a cross of baseball and softball that's been adapted so that the visually impaired can take part in America's favorite past time. The ball is slightly larger than a softball and is equipped with a speaker that signals the players to it's location with a loud, continuous beep.