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Spokane Valley burglars caught in the act

Spokane Valley burglars caught in the act

Two Spokane Valley burglars were caught red-handed Monday.

Spokane Valley police were called to a home in the 7100 block of E. 3rd for a possible burglary in progress.

A neighbor spotted a suspicious man and woman in a nearby home, so they called 911. Once police arrived, the intruders claimed to be the owners of the home, but after double-checking, police verified that the pair was in fact burglarizing the home.

Fifty-six-year-old Steven Cunningham and 37-year-old Jasmine Owens were both booked into the Spokane County Jail on residential burglary charges.

The pair had torn the circuit breaker box apart and were attempting to take copper wire.

High school student turns plastic food bags into totes

High school student turns plastic food bags into totes

We got a call into the newsroom from an adviser at Freeman High School. Jennifer Fees was telling us all about one her students, Lexi Saeger, who is getting crafty to fund her way to the upcoming National Leadership Conference in Florida.

Instead of throwing away those plastic bags containing food for dogs, cats, chickens and more, when they’re empty, Saeger is sewing them into tote bags. She’s creating these products to fund her trip and compete with her creations. She already placed 1st at the state FCCLA competition.

Her totes will be for sale Saturday, April 14th at the Spokane Valley Albertsons, located at 32nd and Highway 27. She’ll be out there at 11 a.m. selling her totes.

Local Entrepreneur Launches New Website

Local Entrepreneur Launches New Website

Every June, I dust off my cowboy boots, pair it with a polka dot sundress and hightail it to The Farm Chicks Antiques Show at the Spokane County Fairgrounds. For self proclaimed "junkers" the show is what Disneyland is to a 5 year old. Really, it's THAT exciting. Trust me.

In this crowd, a slight obsession for all things vintage and fabulous instantly bonds women from across the country. The show features refurbished antique furniture, beautiful, handcrafted home accessories and decor. The search for that perfect vintage piece is all part of the experience.

What started out in a barn in 2002 is now one of the largest show of its kind in the country. Serena Thompson, who lives on Green Bluff, is the entrepreneur responsible for creating the funky and oh. so. fabulous. weekend event.

Thompson has also penned several cookbooks, is a contributing editor for Country Living Magazine, a wife and mom to four boys. Whew! She pretty much rocks.

And now she's getting ready to launch her latest venture, a website called My Favorite Find. I recently had the opportunity to ask Thompson a few questions about her latest project.

AB: Tell me about your latest project My Favorite Find. How did you come up with the idea?

ST: I'd been receiving a lot of mail from all over the world, from readers asking how they could find great events similar to mine or shoppes in their area and from others who were hosting these events and running these shoppes, wondering how they could promote them. I soon realized there wasn't anything for them out there and decided that I'd just create it myself. And My Favorite Find was born.

Making a Big Impact With Just A Dollar Per Month

Making a Big Impact With Just A Dollar Per Month

Each month, Dollar Per Month selects three charities for you to vote on. Dollar Per Month posts information about the charities to help you evaluate each and make your decision. I talked with one of its founders Jason Clerget who told me what the charity is trying to accomplish.

Why did you decide to start DPM?

The story of how www.DollarPerMonth.org (DPM) was created is a long one. The short version is that Doug and I wanted to create a fun community based platform that removed all the barriers to being philanthropic. There are several factors that stand in the way of the average person giving back. With 1.4 million charities when someone wants to donate who should they donate to? Will the money they donate go to the actual cause or towards unnecessary overhead? Will the amount that they have to give really make a difference? Doug and I had faced these issues in our own lives and felt there was a way to make things more efficient and fun. Once we had a system in place we felt that others would benefit from our research and the tools we used.

Classic '36 Ford Vanishes From Valley Home

Classic '36 Ford Vanishes From Valley Home

Dr. Robert Clark has put 21 years of blood, sweat, and tears into the restoration of his beloved 1936 Ford five-window Coupe. Not to mention a few bucks.

Yesterday, his pride and joy vanished from his home in Veradale. As far as Dr. Clark can tell, there's only one clue: a set of tire tracks that appear to be from a dual-wheel pickup. He theorizes a thief pulled up in the dually around noon Wednesday, hooked up his Ford, and simply towed it away.

Aside from being a beautiful vehicle, the Ford holds many special memories for Dr. Clark and his wife, Diane. It was the first car their grand kids ever rode in, each newborn riding shotgun in a baby seat on the trip home from the hospital. Dr. Clark and his Ford have taken part in their share of local parades, too.

Nobody deserves to have their car stolen, but after chatting with the Clarks, well, you can't help but wonder why bad things happen to good people. Dr. Clark has owned Critter Care Mobile Veterinarian for 20 years. Yes, he actually makes house calls. Diane says he's done pro-bono work for folks who've fallen on hard times, and judging from online reviews, his clients think he's the best vet in town.

Bullets and Ink: A Man's Spin On Life

Bullets and Ink: A Man's Spin On Life

Doyle Wheeler approaches life just like he does pens; everything is possible. Throw anything his way and he will make it work for him.

The first lathe Wheeler ever received was from his father. He tinkered with it off and on, not really committing to the craft but enjoying the rhythm of turning a pen. The first ones he ever made became Christmas gifts for family and friends but he insists they weren't any good.

It's what every budding artist – excuse me, craftsman – would say of their early work.

Craftsmanship is in Wheeler's blood. His grandparents built their home in Spokane from the ground up.

Local Teenager Going To The Grammys

Local Teenager Going To The Grammys

A Clarkston teenager is going to the 54th annual Grammy Awards in L.A. In January!

"It's kind of overwhelming it hasn't really hit me just yet," said 17 year old Kevin Simmons.He earned the trip when his music was chosen as the second place winner in a national contest.