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Free adoptions at SCRAPS through June 8

Free adoptions at SCRAPS through June 8

Animals at SCRAPS will be free to a good home starting Thursday as the facility is getting ready to move to a bigger location and it wants to avoid transferring animals if it can.

The adoption fees for all animals at SCRAPS will be waived starting Thursday and will run through June 8. Adopters still have to pay for the pet license fee which varies depending on the animal. The license for cats and kittens is $15 and dogs and puppies are $25.

The adoption includes spay/neutering, vaccinations, micro chipping and an exam.

The goal is to move as many animals as they can into new homes rather than their new facility at the old Harley Davidson building on Trent. Shelter staff say right now they are overflowing with animals.

"Our capacity here is about 80 dogs and probably 80 to 90 cats and we're almost to capacity now. So we have a lot of animals for adoption and we'll continue to have for the next week to 10 days until we move," SCRAPS director Nancy Hill said.

Animals that are not adopted during the sale period will be transferred to the new facility, which is scheduled to open June 12.

SCRAPS testing dogs for adoptability

SCRAPS testing dogs for adoptability

Very little background information is known on most of the animals SCRAPS takes in however, through a series of tests they are able to identify a dog's strengths and weaknesses to determine if the dog is adoptable.

"We're going to look at three things to help us determine if a dog is safe to adopt out into a new home," said Nancy Hill of SCRAPS.

The shelter considers information received by intake from the person turning the dog in.

"Was the dog doing something bad and that's why people or an officer brought it in here? Was it a really nice dog that's just lost," said Hill.

After the dog is at the shelter for a minimum of 24 hours, they take a safe assessment test. The safe assessment is a national test used by shelters throughout the United States.

"We're going to put the dog into different situations and evaluate the dog's reaction," Hill said.

The test ranges from anything like a simple touch to a squeeze to a fake hand being placed in and near the dog's food bowl while they are eating. The dog is ranked in each area on a scale system from one to five.

Animal experts working to dispel 'dangerous pit bull' stereotype

Animal experts working to dispel 'dangerous pit bull' stereotype

Animal experts are working to change the stereotype that all pit bulls are dangerous, but a rash of dog attacks involving pit bulls this last week isn't helping change that image.

Pit bulls and pit bull mixes are the number one biting dog in Spokane County, but that doesn't explain what's actually happening. SCRAPS reports despite their bad reputation these dogs get adopted all the time.

"This last week has been unusual and I am not sure why," Nancy Hill of SCRAPS said of the recent attacks involving pit bulls. "We were all wondering if it was a full moon."

Every animal SCRAPS re-homes goes through a behavior assessment; Hill said the recent pit bull attacks involved dogs that weren't adopted through SCRAPS.

Before re-homing an animal, SCRAPS uses a method approved by the ASPCA for determining its level of aggression, fear, and other traits that could mean bad news. Dogs are rated on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being the perfect dog with no issues while a dog that scores 5 isn't safe to re-home

Why 2013 was actually the Year of the Cat

Why 2013 was actually the Year of the Cat

From WSU News:


The Chinese Year of the Snake ended in 2013, but judging by all the tail swishing it shaped up to be the Year of the Cat.

 

Consider what took place:

SCRAPS takes over animal control services from Spokanimal

SCRAPS takes over animal control services from Spokanimal

Tuesday night marks both the beginning of a new year but also a new era for animal control services in the City of Spokane as animal control services have switched from Spokanimal to SCRAPS.

This transition will mean a new identity for Spokanimal and a new regional level of animal control service for our area. It will also mean a reduction in staff at Spokanimal, but it's also an exciting time and they are looking forward to huge success with their new model.

"As of midnight tonight we are transitioning out of animal control," Spokanimal executive director Gail Mackie said.

It's a bittersweet day for Mackie and her staff at Spokanimal. The city's animal control contract provided 60-percent of their annual funding.

"That's quite a hit of course. We lost all the people that were in that department, three are retained to work inside but we lost a large part of the staff," Mackie said.

The city's hope is to streamline animal control and ultimately creating one regional service provider

SCRAPS offering holiday adoption specials

SCRAPS offering holiday adoption specials

If you’re thinking of getting a family pet this holiday season, December is the month to do it. In an effort to place more animals in permanent homes SCRAPS is offering reduced adoption fees special deals throughout the month of December.


From SCRAPS:

Woman charged for leaving dog in hot car while shopping

Woman charged for leaving dog in hot car while shopping

From the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service:

Today, Candace Bundrock-Brando, age 56, was charged for violations of R.C.W. 16.52.080, confinement in an unsafe manner, for leaving her dog locked in her vehicle while she went shopping in the Spokane Valley.  

SCRAPS Field Operations Manager Nicole Montano responded to a call for help from customers regarding a dog left in a vehicle unattended. Upon arrival, Montano noticed that the driver side and passenger side windows were cracked about two inches. The outside air temperature at the time was 85 degrees. The temperature inside the vehicle ranged from 109 degrees to 117 degrees. The small white dog named Gracie was panting excessively, a sign of heat stress.

Montano was able to get the driver side door unlocked and remove the dog. She put the dog inside her air-conditioned vehicle and offered her water. The dog was taken to the SCRAPS animal shelter for safe keeping until the owner was located.

Confinement in an unsafe manner is criminal misdemeanor punishable by up to 90 days in jail and up to a $1,000 fine.